Last edited by Nirisar
Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995 found in the catalog.

Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995

Virginia L McGuire

Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995

by Virginia L McGuire

  • 13 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey in Lincoln, NE .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Aquifers -- High Plains (U.S.),
  • Groundwater -- High Plains (U.S.),
  • High Plains Aquifer

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesWater level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995, USGS science for a changing world
    Statementby Virginia L. McGuire and Jennifer B. Sharpe
    SeriesFact sheet -- FS-068-97, Fact sheet (Geological Survey (U.S.)) -- FS-97-068
    ContributionsSharpe, Jennifer B, Geological Survey (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[4] p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18019291M

    The High Plains aquifer underlies million acres (, square miles) in parts of eight States—Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. Water-level declines began in parts of the High Plains aquifer soon after the beginning of substantial irrigation with groundwater in the aquifer area. This report presents water-level changes in the High Cited by: Edwards-Trinity (High Plains) Aquifer Quick Facts. Minor aquifer that underlies southern and eastern counties in the HPWD. Recharge to the aquifer is primarily due to downward leakage from the younger Ogallala Aquifer. Freshwater saturated thickness in the aquifer averages feet. Water quality is generally slightly saline.

    The area-weighted, average water-level changes in the aquifer were an overall decline of feet from predevelopment to , and a decline of foot from – Water-level Change () Mao Created by Casey Dunn Sources: USGS SIR, US Census 3 February The t -le v e l c maps generally show increases and decreases of the aquifer's water levels. Shades of red indicate a decrease, yellow indicates "no change," while shades of green indicate an increase. wa er hange The High Plains.

    The High Plains Aquifer. The High Plains Aquifer system consists of Tertiary sedimentary rock, dominantly sandstone and gravel (Figure 45), eroded from the ancient Rocky Mountains and deposited in the Tertiary period (from about 31 to 5 million years ago). The Ogallala Formation is the primary aquifer unit in the system. The High Plains aquifer, one of the largest freshwater aquifers in the world, is the primary source of potable and irrigation waters in the central Great Plains and underpins much of the region’s economy (Fig. 1).The aquifer provides ~30% of irrigation waters for the United States and drinking water for 82% of the population living within the aquifer boundary (Dennehy, ).


Share this book
You might also like
Early Western Travels

Early Western Travels

Ninth report.

Ninth report.

Exploring the labyrinth

Exploring the labyrinth

Analysis of engineering structures.

Analysis of engineering structures.

Jane Austen, her life and letters

Jane Austen, her life and letters

John Tilton, builder

John Tilton, builder

Quaternary faulting within the Ecemçiş Fault Zone, south central Turkey

Quaternary faulting within the Ecemçiş Fault Zone, south central Turkey

Scotland

Scotland

Ill look after that!

Ill look after that!

Where rivers meet

Where rivers meet

No Breathing Room

No Breathing Room

23rd Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

23rd Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

British police in a changing society.

British police in a changing society.

Johnsons standard first aid manual

Johnsons standard first aid manual

Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995 by Virginia L McGuire Download PDF EPUB FB2

High Plains Aquifer Water-Level Monitoring Study Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer, to By Virginia L. McGuire and Jennifer B. Sharpe. U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet FS Lincoln, Nebraska Introduction.

Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer • Water-Level Change, to • Water-Level Change, to • References. The pattern of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer from to is based on water levels from 4, wells that were measured in and and wells in New Mexico that were measured in and between and but not measured in Additional Physical Format: Online version: Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, to [Reston, Va.?]: U.S.

Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological. The pattern of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer from to (view a high-resolution PDF map) is based on measurements from 5, wells (table 1).Areas with substantial water-level declines from predevelopment to in southwestern Kansas and northwestern Texas continued to decline from to Get this from a library.

Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, to [Virginia L McGuire; Jennifer B Sharpe; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. WATER-LEVEL CHANGES, to Figure 1. Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, toand areas with 50 to feet and to feet of water-level decline in the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment to U.S.

Department of the. Water-level change in the High Plains aquifer, to The High Plains aquifer underlies one of the major agricultural areas in the world in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. Nearly 30 percent of the ground water used for irriga-tion in the United States is pumped from the High.

This data set consists of digital water-level-change contours for the High Plains aquifer in the United States, to The High Plains aquifer, which underlies aboutsquare miles in parts of eight states, is the principal water source in one of the nation's major agricultural areas.

Area-weighted, average water-level changes for the aquifer were declines of feet from tofeet from tofeet from toand foot from to Estimated changes in water in storage were declines of million acre-feet from tomillion acre-feet from tomillion. The U.S. Geological Survey has released a new report detailing changes of groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer.

The report presents water-level change data in the aquifer for two separate periods: from – the time prior to significant groundwater irrigation development – toand from to Water-level change in the High Plains aquifer underlying parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming results from differences in recharge from precipitation and ground-water withdrawals for irrigation.

From the beginning of irrigation development () towater levels declined in several areas, and exceeded feet in parts of the Central.

The Ogallala Aquifer (oh-guh-LAH-luh) is a shallow water table aquifer surrounded by sand, silt, clay, and gravel located beneath the Great Plains in the United States. One of the world's largest aquifers, it underlies an area of approximatelysq mi (, km 2) in portions of eight states (South Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas).

The Ogallala Aquifer, or High Plains Aquifer, is a vast yet shallow aquifer located beneath the Great Plains in the United States. One of the world's largest aquifers, it lies under aboutmi² (, km²) in portions of South Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas.

It was named in by N.H. Darton from its type locality near the town of. Detailed Description. High Plains aquifer water-level changes, predevelopment (about ) to Figure 1 from USGS SIR Details.

Image Dimensions: x (A3) Supplemental water-level change data used to substantiate the map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment (about ) to (B1) Spatial data set of mapped water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, to (B2) Water-level change data used to map water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, Water Level Declines in the High Plains Aquifer: Predevelopment to Resource Senescence by Erin M.

Haacker1, Anthony D. Kendall 2, and David W. Hyndman Abstract A large imbalance between recharge and water withdrawal has caused vital regions of the High Plains Aquifer (HPA) to experience significant declines in Size: 3MB. Water-level changes, toand saturated thickness,in the High Plains aquifer by Geological Survey (U.S.) 1 edition - first published in Not in Library.

Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer - Predevelopment to (WRIR). 55 pp., size " x 11". Description: Sections wiht illustrations showing estimated average potential recharge and consumptive irrigation requirements have been added to the discussion and factors affecting water-level changes in the High Plains.

Ogallala/Edwards Trinity (High Plains) Water Level Summary (PDF) Dockum Water Level Summary (PDF) Irrigation Assessment Results (PDF) AIM Round 1 Report (PDF) HPWD discontinued its printed water level report in Ashworth, J.

B.,Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer of Texas: Texas Water Development Board Hydrologic Atlas No.I, one sheet. The High Plains Aquifer System of Texas to Subject: Report - The High Plains Aquifer System of Texas to. Farmed Out: Overpumping Threatens to Deplete U.S. High Plains Groundwater.

The former dust bowl’s lone water source could run dry without a change in agricultural practices.This report presents water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer from the time before substantial groundwater irrigation development had occurred (about and termed “predevelopment” in.The U.S.

Geological Survey has released a new report detailing changes of groundwater levels in the High Plains Aquifer. The report presents water-level change data in the aquifer in two separate periods: from –the time prior to significant groundwater irrigation development–toand to